Sunday Edition 23 December

Moin, everyone!

Jay Rayner went to a rather nice little restaurant and Chris Riddell shows the Tory Christmas tree in all its glory.

Some botany and literary history: Gawain and the Green Knight.

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51 thoughts on “Sunday Edition 23 December

  1. Daleaway

    Morning/evening all!

    An observation: make a comment favourable to women and unfavourable to men BTL, and male readers will react in one of two ways – gang attack or hammerer.
    It is usually gang attack – the Not All Men peddlers and the All Girls Are Dumb and Stinky primary school set join forces to shut up this filthy feminist.

    However, under the Charles Dickens Invented Christmas article the other day is a prime example of the hammerer. Though everyone else has moved on, for some reason the comments are still open, and one guy keeps returning to see if he can hammer me to death with a small nail. Or at least stop me talking. I am replying now just out of curiosity to see how long he will keep this up.

    My point, yes modern people are entitled to look at human nature in past events because human nature does not change from one century to another. His point, that it is anachronistic and that I do not understand Victorian mores. (However, as I was in the main brought up by three Victorians, I bet I understand them a lot better than he does, because I have lived them.)

    Liked by 4 people

    1. eidos3

      I was brought up in a surprisingly Victorian way, too – my mother was born in 1915, but evidently the family had hung on to a lot of things from the 19th century. The other side was even more so.
      Funny how that sort of thing does ‘invade’ one.
      As to Victorian mores, well, read some good books on the Victorian criminal world, and then read ‘Walter’s diary, and you will learn a lot about Victorian mores. (Dickens being useful too, especially in his Uncommercial Traveller and Reprinted Pieces.) All that would be my advice to this character… but probably useless.

      So keep it up, Dale!

      Liked by 3 people

    1. Interesting article and like you I was very intimate with my mother’s Victorian parents and in my earliest years, probably spent most of my time with them.

      Back to w*** today, hopefully I will leave a little early to go shopping with Azza. While I do a lot of the food shopping myself, its for very different reasons to Charles Dickens!

      Liked by 3 people

    1. Daleaway

      Heehee, he’ll probably enjoy the attention. Thanks a heap. You are a jewel.
      How are things with you today?
      We are having a tiny respite from Mum’s panic phone calls today, I won’t describe the alarms of the last few days, much too tedious, but we have TWICE had to cancel an ambulance (called by her on her wrist alarm) and deal with the issue ourselves. MrD is almost at the end of his rope and is right now sending emails to his family because we never had time to do cards or letters.
      And we still have not had the discussion about what to do on Christmas Day. Plot totally lost. My poor sister has been so ill and so short tempered.
      Sixes and sevens does not even begin to describe the state we are in. But at least I have wrapped the presents and put them under the tree, giving us some illusion of being in charge round here!

      Liked by 4 people

      1. milan renaud

        Darling Dale, you really are having a time of it, aren’t you? As am I, and so is my poor mum. They’ve been restoring and replacing the window frames in her building. Vast amounts of dust everywhere and now they’ve all buggered off on leave with the job half done. Big gaps between the frames and the outside walls means rain and snow getting into the cavities, but not actually into the flats, thank heavens. As usual, the job was promised to be done within three weeks, and here we are, two months later.

        I have a stonker of a tooth abscess, and am going to the dental clinic tomorrow. In lots of pain. Can’t sleep more than twenty minutes without being woken by pain. And then this morning received an email from the friends with whom I was to spend Boxing day and New Years Eve cancelling all plans. Understandably, as one friend of theirs has passed away, and the service is being held on Boxing Day. Another of their friends is on the way out, and is having a sort of farewell dinner on New Years Eve. Although now at a loose end on both of those days, I’m actually rather pleased, as I really dislike driving around at this time of the year. They had pushed me to spend these two days with them, and I reluctantly accepted. I’m frankly relieved I shan’t have to be on the road driving hither, thither and yon, then.

        I do hope everything settles down on your side of the globe, that your mum calms down and your poor sister feels better anon. The ones I really feel sorry for are you and Mr Dale. xox

        Liked by 3 people

        1. Daleaway

          That is so kind of you. I am no stranger to tooth abscesses and know how you must be suffering. When you get sick of oil of cloves, remember whisky is not a bad painkiller, although the best I found was a specific mouth pain gel called Bonjela. Maybe it is available locally for you?

          Get into that dentist and make her/him earn his keep. And white wine is a good gum wash if you have an extraction or major work done. I recall seeing a dentist both before and after Easter, and him complimenting me on the mouthwash I had used to keep the area clean and promote healing. Actually I had a brand new boyfriend at the time and had spent Easter drinking white wine with him. I told the dentist as much and he said he would be recommending it in future.

          Liked by 4 people

          1. milan renaud

            Thanks for the tip on Bonjela. I will have a look for it. I have no whisky here, sadly, but do have some nice white wine which I will apply.

            Liked by 3 people

            1. Daleaway

              So you missed the fanny fanny pack?
              (As a change from the manny packs?)
              Get back in there, wuss-boy.
              MrD is laughing his socks off at them. It’s nice to see him smile, after the last couple of months.

              Liked by 3 people

  2. Daleaway

    I was just sent these from a UK friend:

    And some health warnings…
    1) Hospitals reported 4 broken arms last year after cracker pulling accidents.
    2) Three people die each year testing if a 9v battery works on their tongue.
    3) Five people were injured last year in accidents involving out of control Scalextric cars.
    4) Eight people cracked their skull in 1997 after falling asleep while throwing up into the toilet.
    5) Eighteen people had serious burns in 1998 trying on a new jumper with a lit cigarette in their mouth.
    6) Nineteen people have died in the last 3 years believing that Christmas decorations were chocolate.
    7) Thirty one people have died since 1996 by watering their Christmas tree while the fairy lights were plugged in.
    8) Fifty eight people are injured each year by using sharp knives instead of screwdrivers.
    9) One hundred and one people since 1997 have had to have broken parts of plastic toys pulled out of the soles of their feet.
    10) One hundred and forty two people were injured in 1998 by not removing all pins from new shirts.

    Be very careful out there…
    Nighty night all!

    Liked by 3 people

  3. eidos3

    I hope, Dale, everything straightens out very soon.
    MIlan, let the magic powers of the dentist fix all that. In one go. Painlessly.

    The Jay Rayner review is highly unusual. Why? Read BTL. This is the first time that I’ve run into this kind of situation!

    Liked by 3 people

  4. eidos3

    https://www.theguardian.com/science/2018/dec/23/jurassic-park-film-inspires-new-era-of-dinosaur-discoveries

    It seems Spielberg did science a favour (although I am sure lots of Crichton’s readers did too).
    I read the book on a summer afternoon back in the early nineties, a good deal before the film. It was entertaining, and the nice thing for me was that something I have been interested in for all my life – dinosaurs – played such a major role in a novel.
    My mother was born and grew up in an area of Alberta that is now Dinosaur National Park. In the summer of 1966, my parents, who were what is known as ‘rockhounds’ (i.e. amateur geologists and mineralogists) went there with us kids in tow. There was no restriction on fossil hunting at the time, although the park already existed. I found a section of leg bone, probably of a duck-billed dinosaur (hadrosaur or something). My mother had known the palaeontologist who came out from New York in the 1920s.
    So dinosaurs are sort of in my blood. Hence the interest in the article linked to above. And it’s true – the last 25 years have been absolutely spectacular. We know more about them now than ever before, and new discoveries continue to be made.
    A link to Wikipedia on the Park:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dinosaur_Provincial_Park

    Liked by 3 people

      1. eidos3

        Depends on how you see it. Casement was a traitor, or he was a hero. Ask around.

        The case itself was not without merit – the punishment was.

        I should be careful!

        Liked by 1 person

  5. The comma story was interesting. Having a lot of comma discussions with Ghaidaa, my translator colleague and fellow editor at w*** these days. At least, not only it is actual work, but I miss the Kuwait Creative Writers’ Workshop when such subjects occupied many a pleasant evening.
    Back from shopping with Azza, so on to Jay….

    Liked by 2 people

          1. Obviously have not read that far, in between unpacking shopping and other home chores including feeding our feline house guest and answering some arrogant b*****d on the sprouts thread. All in a day’s work. I’m now intrigued about the screaming matches. Possibly not the best PR move depending on who was screaming. Clearly I must read on.

            Possibly unrelated, but there was one Filipino camera store manager of a (then) camera dealership and film lab and one Egyptian who used to come to our lectures and concerts who had been in the tourism business in Egypt. They were both brilliant in lowering the temperature of any possible dispute. Both managed to turn the tables in a great way. Some customers can be a pain, things are not always, one-sided. Quite a few current politicians seem lacking in the arts of negotiation and, well, sales expertise, despite one famous one having a ghosted book… but here I will get my coat…

            Liked by 2 people

  6. interiorbc

    Hello all,
    The mr is scheduled to come home tomorrow, albeit with tubes and drains, but home for Christmas 🙂
    I will be off for four days, maybe more depending on how he is doing, so I will take this opportunity to wish you a safe and very Merry Christmas / Joyeux Noel / Froliche (sp?) Weinachten and every other festive greeting.
    The very best to you and yours.
    xox
    inty

    Liked by 2 people

  7. Getting late and need some beauty sleep as one does. The Sandi Toksvig piece was light, https://www.theguardian.com/culture/2018/dec/23/sandi-toksvig-radar-cultural-highlights-sondheim-hygge, but OK mostly Azza and I were talking about all kinds of stuff, so while she is more cutting edge, it was a good coda for the evening. Of corse w*** reared its head with a Bengali film scheduled on a non-scheduled day. Grrrrrrrrr. I do want a sari for the New Year! though.

    Liked by 2 people

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